Inhaled corticosteroids for pediatric asthma

There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below , while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of . Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of and respectively, while this increased to for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of . Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (>20×10(-6) cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (>5×10(-6) cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs.

Poor Growth: While poor growth can result from ICS, poorly controlled asthma can also lead to poor growth in children. In general, low and medium doses of ICS are potentially associated with small, non-progressive but reversible declines in growth of children. As a result, you and your asthma provider should not only carefully monitor growth, but try to use the lowest possible dose that gets good control of your child's asthma. You must weigh the potential benefits of good asthma control with the small but real possible side effect of slowed growth.

Inhaled corticosteroids for pediatric asthma

inhaled corticosteroids for pediatric asthma

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