Video cervical epidural steroid injection

We note these studies not to discourage you from undergoing epidural steroid injections, but rather to help foster well-rounded discussions with your doctor. These injections have been shown to provide excellent pain relief in many patients (particularly those who have had symptoms for less than 3 months, not had a previous spine surgery, are younger than 60 years, and don’t smoke). However, epidural steroid injections are not magic bullets. Before starting injection therapy, talk to your doctor about the specific risks and benefits for you.

Spinal epidural abscess: At the beginning of the 20th century, almost all individuals with spinal epidural abscess died. However, associated mortality rates have dropped significantly over the past 50 years, likely because of better diagnostic modalities. Nonetheless, despite advances in imaging and surgical care, the current mortality rate ranges from 2%-20%. [ 1 , 2 , 8 ] Not surprisingly, the mortality risk is greater in those with severe underlying comorbidities or uncontrolled sepsis. Differences in etiology (ie, iatrogenic vs noniatrogenic) do not affect the prognosis. The essential problem of spinal epidural abscess lies in the necessity of early diagnosis, as permanent neurological deficits and possible mortality can be avoided or reduced only with timely treatment.

Epidurals don’t increase the rate of C-sections. In fact, I would argue that it is likely that they lower the rate of C-sections. I am often asked to place an epidural in a woman whose labour has stalled so that Pitocin can be used (OMG! Not that evil drug Pitocin! The horror!) to advance the labour to the point where she can deliver vaginally, thus avoiding a C-section. Pitocin can make contractions very painful. An epidural can make such a labour much more tolerable. The comment about epidurals causing POP is quite shocking. These are actually the cases where we are often asked to place an epidural so that Pitocin can be used to get the child out of POP to avoid a C-section.

General pre/post instructions
Patients can eat a light meal within a few hours before the procedure. If a patient is an insulin dependent diabetic, they must not change their normal eating pattern prior to the procedure. Patients may take their routine medications. (. high blood pressure and diabetic medications). Patients should not take pain medications or anti-inflammatory medications the day of their procedure. Patients have to be hurting prior to this procedure. They may not take medications that may give pain relief or lessen their usual pain. These medicines can be restarted after the procedure if they are needed. If a patient is on Coumadin (blood thinners) or Glucophage (a diabetic medicine) they must notify the office so the timing of these medications can be explained.

Video cervical epidural steroid injection

video cervical epidural steroid injection

General pre/post instructions
Patients can eat a light meal within a few hours before the procedure. If a patient is an insulin dependent diabetic, they must not change their normal eating pattern prior to the procedure. Patients may take their routine medications. (. high blood pressure and diabetic medications). Patients should not take pain medications or anti-inflammatory medications the day of their procedure. Patients have to be hurting prior to this procedure. They may not take medications that may give pain relief or lessen their usual pain. These medicines can be restarted after the procedure if they are needed. If a patient is on Coumadin (blood thinners) or Glucophage (a diabetic medicine) they must notify the office so the timing of these medications can be explained.

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